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Name: Ciaran bradley
21/9/2009
The stone loach,barbel looking fish widespread lives in gravel bottom rivers,unpolluted streams and rivers throughout britain and ireland except in n. scotland,bottom dwelling species.
Name: Philip Maguire
20/9/2009
Dont forget lads about the clean up at ponds on wednesday  evening about 5 30,
Same faces have been there the last 2 weeks.
It would be nice to see some new faces doing a wee bit of work,Wont be long now to the 10th Oct and still a bit of work to be done,
There might be a bit of a suprise there on wed evening.
Name: willy darragh
19/9/2009
just a note to refresh peoples minds the club has 2 complimentry tickets for the maine angling stretch of water anyone wishing to use them who are in our club can do so just get in contact with my self via this guest book or by ringing me tight lines
Name: ciaran bradley
18/9/2009
hows it going seamus, it is possible that we might be interbreeding these dollaghan,reading on this in a book it states that there is a number of different trout that scientific studies have shown spawn separately and this will maintain a genetic isolation.My own opinion on this is that the fish should be left to spawn naturally and all we need do is keep the river as clean and healthy as possible,we look after the river and the fish will do what nature intended.
Name: Seamus Donnelly
18/9/2009
Ciaran/Patsy

Do you think these different strains of Dollaghan would breed with each other in the wild.
When the hens are stripped in the various hatcheries around Lough Neagh, the chances are that the cock fish used to cover them is of a different strain.
Are we messing with the genitics in the hatcheries??
Name: patsy h
18/9/2009
Ciaran, I have also caught very small trout around the 6-8 oz mark in the lower ends of the river. Definitely not smolts as I have plenty of experience here. I suspect that they may be seatrout (finnock) rather than lough trout ?. A really silver little fish with a blueish hint. Very good fighters for thier size, usually leaping a few times, . They can fool you into thinking for a short while that they are much bigger!
Name: ciaran bradley
18/9/2009
Hows it going patsy,the "buddagh"is apparently the last running of the neagh trout and the largest  like the ferox.The "breddach" is the wee silvery trout ranging in size from 1lb to 2or3lb and they feed mainly on small fish in the lough ,molluscs and midge pupae.TIGHT LINES.
Name: ciaran bradley
18/9/2009
Can everone please stop commenting on the weir,this matter is being dealt with ongoing talks etc.I hope i am wrong in saying that some people are trying to wind things up so keep all comments for committee meetings thankyou.
Name: willy darragh
17/9/2009
with reference to the marks under the bellies of the fish i myself have caught fish with these marks namley trout and dollaghan, not any salmon but i did retrieve a 7/8 lb clean dead fish last year from below the factory hole with a 6inch long red rawness on the under bellie this was in sept which was a long time of spawning i agree but the marks on the trout were not the same these were thumb nail size under the gill plate ive also caught fish on 2 other rivers with these marks so these type of markings are not unique to our river so i would be scepticale about this happining on the weir i agree that back end fish do have the difficulty in scaling the weir but as i said earlier we should perhaps not discuss the weir issue in this forum but certainly at the comittee meeting regards to all
Name: patsy h
17/9/2009
I see Ciaran's comment mentioning buddagh. I not too sure but at the "back of my head" I think I heard that there are seven or so different names for lough neagh trout. The two that come to mind to me are black buddagh and obviously Dollaghan. Anyone have any other names? I think that black buddagh referred to extremely large late run lough trout that existed in the past?
Name: Ciaran bradley
17/9/2009
So what does the word Dollaghan mean ? It is an irish gaelic word "dulach"which means swift running and dollaghan translated means "run of fish or running fish"Other names for these magnificent trout are "buddagh and breddach which mean "big fat fellow and salmon trout.Tight lines and lets look after these wonderful fish.
Name: Michael McGlade
17/9/2009
To say that fish damage their bellies to the extent which we saw last year, and again this year, by digging redds is just plain silly. I have pictures of a salmon caught in early September last year, [at least 3 months away from spawning], and I would estimate that at least 60% of fish taken to hatchery last year were damaged - which I have included in a report. No more excuses can be made for this weir, and there should be no attempts to explain away the visibile damage it is causing to both salmon and dollaghan. We need more people to record, and where possible, take pictures of these damaged fish.
Name: Steven O'Brien
17/9/2009
I have caught fish which have damage to their underbellies. Is it not the case that fish caught below the weir with damage have dropped back down the river after trying to get up the weir during all that water. I don't think there is another wier like this in the country. I watched one fish trying to hold itself on the concrete for more than an hour, last week, how could it not be damaged after this?? Where else could this damage be caused, definitely not Newbridge, and you cant blame the weirs on the Bann, as the dollaghan don't have to come up the Bann.
Name: Willy Darragh
15/9/2009
hi paddy with response as to which mepp is good for catching dollaghan in big water,you can try size 4/5 willow blades silver or gold depending on colour, one of my favourites,but its not the mepp sometimes itself but how its fished. running fish i find tend to take at the tail of the pool,when the water drops downsize perhaps size 0/1 or 2 even. try deep runs throwing into the neck of the pool drawing the mepp downstream, try various methods cover all the water , hope this helps you ,but always rember its the fish that decides. tight lines
Name: Willy Darragh
14/9/2009
without getting into a debate about the weir again these fish were not caught above the weir but well below it and would doubt if they had even had tried to acsend it yet yes i agree that fish do use their tail to dig a redd but the underside of the bellie can also get damage in a lot of cases
tight lines
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